‘The border fence is a joke’: Filmmaker crosses from US to Mexico dressed as Osama bin Laden

A flamethrowing American conservative activist raised eyebrows in the U.S. on Monday by releasing a video of himself crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico into Texas, dressed as the late al-Qaeda terror mastermind Osama bin Laden.

Guerrilla documentarian James O’Keefe’s footage comes at a time when Americans are engaged in a national debate about border security. Tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors from Central America have entered the U.S. illegally in recent months, drawn by a confusing White House policy that appears to offer amnesty for those who make it safely.

In Monday’s video release, O’Keefe focuses on the implications for national security: He illegally crosses into Mexico twice and returns – first in street clothes and again in army fatigues, wearing an Osama bin Laden Halloween mask.

O’Keefe talked to a Texas sheriff who conceded that illegal immigrants can enter the U.S. by moving a metal fencepost and walking around a few strands of barbed wire

The official White House website includes a claim that ‘today border security is stronger than it has ever been.’

But O’Keefe told MailOnline that his stunt proves the federal government’s policy is lax and needs a dramatic overhaul.

‘We proved that border security is national security. The fence is not complete. The border is not secure. In fact, the video shows the border fence is a joke.’

‘The primary responsibility of the commander-in-chief is to protect the homeland,’ said O’Keefe. ‘With a single trip to the border, we proved that President Obama and Congress have failed miserably and are misleading America.’

A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol official told MailOnline that his agency’s forces are stretched to the breaking point.

‘We can’t be everywhere at once,’ the official said Monday. ‘This is typical of what you’ll find in Texas.’

‘The guys who are on the front lines aren’t even on the front lines anymore. They’re dozens of miles inside the U.S. How can we catch the bad guys if we never see them until they’re standing on American soil?’

But this week his attention was focused on Mexico, saying in his six-minute film that ‘this border is not secure. No one is on watch.’

If bin Laden can cross into the U.S., he says, ‘anybody can cross. … Do you feel safe?’

In a 2011 speech at the border, President Obama claimed that his policies had ‘strengthened border security beyond what many thought possible.’

‘The fence is now basically complete,’ the president claimed.

But Hudspeth County, Texas Sheriff Arvin West showed O’Keefe how his county’s 98-mile stretch of border territory includes a secured fence that stops abruptly, as though construction crews ran out of materials one day and walked off the job.

‘That’s the dead end of it right there,’ West says, pointing to a crude barbed-wire fence that continues on to mark the border.

If you think four strands of barbed wire is securing the border,’ he explains, ‘then I guess it’s secure.’

via ‘The border fence is a joke’: Filmmaker crosses from US to Mexico dressed as Osama bin Laden as Border Patrol says ‘we can’t be everywhere at once’ | Mail Online.

Robin Williams and the Pop Culture Media

Robin Williams and the Pop Culture Media  – The Rush Limbaugh Show

RUSH:  ….This really is an example of the dedication the media has to pop culture events and how important it is in the eyes of their audience.  Whereas in Washington, the media thinks the world is on fire because of what’s happening in the Middle East, your average TMZ viewer thinks the world doesn’t make any sense anymore because Robin Williams committed suicide.

The thing I worry about, I really do, they’re making such heroism out of this that I hope it doesn’t inspire a lot of copycats by people seeking the same kind of fame.  And that’s been one of my big concerns with social media from the get-go.  I saw all these people just giving up every bit of information about themselves, just this desire to have everybody know everything about them, and we know that one of the allures of pop culture media is this desire to be famous and have pop culture media talk about you.  And this is one way to do it, obviously.  To kill yourself is one way to get the media to spend a lot of time talking about you, if you want to be talked about.  I hope it doesn’t spawn a bunch of copycats.

RUSH:  So our last caller from Des Plaines, Illinois, wanted to know, “What is the politics in the coverage of the suicide of Robin Williams?”  Well, I believe there is some.  But I don’t think that the politics is driving it.  I think there was, on the part of media and Hollywood, genuine affection for the guy that is driving it, but there is politics.  If you notice the coverage is focused on how much he had, but it wasn’t enough.

He had everything, everything that you would think would make you happy.  But it didn’t.”  Now, what is the left’s worldview in general?  What is it? If you had to attach not a philosophy but an attitude to a leftist worldview, it’s one of pessimism and darkness, sadness.  They’re never happy, are they?  They’re always angry about something. No matter what they get, they’re always angry.

He had it all, but he had nothing.  He made everybody else laugh but was miserable inside.  I mean, it fits a certain picture, or a certain image that the left has.  Talk about low expectations and general unhappiness and so forth.

People are voluntarily telling everybody every detail about themselves, casting every aspect of their privacy aside just because they want fame. They want to be noticed. They all want to be on TV.  There’s a lot of fame and the media’s doing every story about this is a story of greatness — unparalleled, unequaled, unique greatness.

You know, I don’t know what else there is to say.  I’ve never been one who thought that suicide was heroic nor something to be glorified.  And the reason is simple:  We all only get one life, and I don’t think there’s anything more precious.  And, of course, I think that’s something everybody alive takes for granted.  Well, not all time, some people don’t, obviously.  But most people just take it for granted.

I also believe that — well, I don’t want to go there.  (interruption)  No, no, no.  I was just gonna say that there’s so many people that believe in heaven that it makes somehow, sometimes life on earth just not worth it, ’cause there is something better out there.  And that may be true, but it’s still a life wasted, and it’s the only one any of us ever get.  I have always thought suicide was one of the most depressing tragedies and certainly not something that should be reported on in a way that might make others want to do it.  But that’s just me.

via Robin Williams and the Pop Culture Media – The Rush Limbaugh Show.

Water Shortages Expected to Continue in SW US

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — One of the main reservoirs in the vast Colorado River water system that is struggling to serve the booming Southwest will get more water this year, but that won’t be enough to pull Lake Mead back from near-record lows.

Water managers, farmers and cities throughout the region have been closely watching the elevation at the reservoir behind Hoover Dam. It is at its lowest level since the dam was complete and the lake first was filled in the 1930s.

A drop to 1,075 would mean cuts in water deliveries to Arizona and Nevada.

Despite the additional water, Lake Mead is projected to remain near record lows at 1,083 feet in January – three feet higher than it was Wednesday. That’s because more water will be delivered to cities, farms, American Indian communities and Mexico than Lake Mead will get from Lake Powell.

Some water managers and users have been saving water for potential dry days or preparing for an expected water shortage in 2016. Bureau of Reclamation spokeswoman Rose Davis said officials still are running numbers that would show the percentage chance of cuts in 2016. Those figures are expected to be released later this month.

The entire Colorado River system supplies water to California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming and part of Mexico.

via News from The Associated Press.